These are the top 5 questions homeowners ask us about their roof/siding replacement process. Hopefully these answers can help you avoid some serious pitfalls. Please feel free to call us with any questions you may have. Doing the right things up front can help you avoid serious problems down the road.

Q. A roofing company told me that insurance isn't required because our homeowner's insurance would cover any issues. They also said that by doing the job on a Sunday, they can avoid having to get a permit. They said they can save me over $2,000 on my roof replacement. Is this true?

In a word...NO. If a worker get's hurt, or your neighbors property is damaged they will most likely sue you. Your homeowners insurance policy will not cover you if your contractor is uninsured or if a permit is not pulled. Fraudulent contractors will often tell you that your homeowners policy will cover you and that they can save you money...they can cost you your home.

Q. I just hired a siding company to re-side our house. On the first day they've already managed to tear down the old material and have put up 1/2 of a wall. My neighbor had his house re-sided recently and asked to take a look at the work. He pulled on the siding and it was nailed tight...it would not move at all. I thought this was good but he tells me that the siding is supposed to be able to move sideways if it's installed properly. He says it may warp...what should I do?

Tell them to stop! Properly installed siding will be nailed in firmly but with space for the shingles to expand and contract as per temperature variations. In the winter it will contract, in the summer it will expand. If they are nailed in too tightly or too loosely they will probably warp and it will look terrible. Not to mention that it can allow for water to damage your interior.
At this point, your best bet is probably to cut your losses and get a new contractor.

Q. A roofer told me that he could save me about $1,500 by layering the new roof over the old roof? He said it was legal. Is that true?

In some jurisdictions it is legal, however, you are putting 0ver 7,000 pounds of extra weight on your roof. That can do serious damage to the roof's framing especially when
you consider that each inch of snow weighs 1 pound per square foot. That means that a snow storm with 1 foot of snow weighs approximately 24,000 pounds. That kind of weight can cause serious damage.

Q. A siding company gave us a written quote. It was a few thousand dollars less than other quotes we've gotten. I noticed that it does not include insulation and the material is .040 gauge while other quotes included insulation and the material is .044. My husband says it's ok, as long as it looks good and we save $3,000. Is he right?

Most happily married men know that usually, their wives are right...you certainly are!...lol. It does make a big difference....044 gauge material is considerably stronger and much more likely to survive a baseball hitting it or a branch crashing into it during a thunderstorm. 3/8 inch insulation behind it not only keeps your home warmer in the winter, but it strengthens the shingles themselves making cracks much less likely. Remind him that cutting corners almost always costs you more in the long run and that a husband who has a happy wife, has a happy life...

Q. A roofing company told us that upon inspecting the roof, they believe the roof has some structural damage. We know that's true because we have a leak and the roof seems to sag. The sales rep gave us an estimate instead of a quote because he said there is no way of knowing how much it will cost to replace the damaged framing until the old roof is ripped off. When it's torn off, then he can tell us how much it'll cost to replace the framing. Is that right?

Sort of...it's true that you can't really tell the extent of framing damage to a roof until the old roof is torn off. However, a reputable company will tell you how much it will cost to replace each piece of sheathing and each rafter. This way, if you need 3 sheathing planks and 4 rafters, you'll know how much the cost should be...also, make sure they provide good pictures.